School of Communication & Journalism

CMJN Tenure and Promotion Guidelines

Promotion and Tenure Review

Candidates for promotion and tenure should carefully read the AU Faculty Handbook Promotion and Tenure policies before applying. Should a candidate feel that she or he meets the requirements for tenure and promotion she or he should consult the timeline for the submission of materials, which is established each year by the Office of the Provost.

Regarding tenure, the AU Faculty Handbook states:

3.6.1. Promotion Criteria Considerations

Promotion is based on merit. A candidate for promotion should have acceptable achievements in the areas of (1) teaching and/or outreach and (2) research/creative work. They are further expected to demonstrate over a sustained period distinctive achievement in one of these areas or achievement in both areas comparable to that of successful candidates in the discipline in the past five years. In addition, they are expected to have contributed service to the University. Candidates covered by provost-approved departmental promotion and tenure guidelines will be evaluated accordingly.  For candidates not covered by provost-approved departmental promotion and tenure guidelines, the criteria for teaching, research/creative work, and outreach described below shall be considered by the faculty in the evaluation of a candidate's performance and achievement. The candidate's employment conditions and academic assignments shall determine which criteria are most emphasized, and standards for promotion are based on the weights of each performance area as described in the letter of offer and subsequent annual evaluations. Credit shall also be given for contributions above and beyond specifically assigned duties.

3.6.2. Tenure Criteria and Considerations

Auburn University nurtures and defends the concept of academic tenure, which assures each faculty member the freedom, without jeopardy at the department, college or school, or University level, to criticize and advocate changes in existing theories, beliefs, programs, policies, and institutions and guarantees faculty members the right to support, without jeopardy, any colleague whose academic freedom is threatened. Tenure establishes an environment in which truth can be sought and expressed in one’s teaching, research/creative work, outreach work, and service. In addition to demonstrating quality in the areas of (1) teaching, (2) research/creative work, (3) outreach, and (4) service, as described above under Promotion Criteria Considerations (Section 3.6.1) and, where applicable, in approved departmental guidelines, the candidate for tenure must demonstrate that they contribute as a productive and collegial member of the academic unit in all relevant areas. Are the candidate’s professional abilities and relationships with colleagues compatible with the departmental mission and with its long-term goals? Has the candidate exhibited an ability and willingness to engage in shared academic and administrative tasks that a departmental group must often perform and to participate with some measure of reason and knowledge in discussions germane to departmental policies and programs? Does the candidate maintain high standards of professional integrity? Concerns respecting a candidate’s collegiality should be shared with the candidate as soon as they arise; they should certainly be addressed in the annual review and the third-year review. For tenure, the candidate must demonstrate that they contribute as a productive and collegial member of the academic unit in all relevant areas.

3.6.4 Eligibility for Promotion and Tenure

There is no fixed requirement for years of service at a given rank before a faculty member can be promoted or tenured. However, the qualifications for tenure or for promotion to associate professor generally cannot be demonstrated fully in less than five complete years of service; promotion to professor cannot be demonstrated fully in less than four complete years on full-time appointment at the associate professor level. Only in exceptional and well-documented cases, in which a faculty member has met all requirements for promotion and/or tenure in a shorter time, should they be recommended for promotion and/or tenure before meeting these standard expectations for completed years in rank.

The norm for consideration of candidates for tenure and promotion to associate professor is therefore during the sixth year of appointment. A candidate must be considered for tenure during their sixth year if they have not been granted tenure earlier and have not waived consideration. Under no circumstances should the length of the probationary period exceed seven years of full-time service except where the faculty member has agreed in writing that a year in which the faculty member qualified for leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) or took leave without pay will not count toward the probationary period. The written agreement must be received by the provost within the probationary year in which the extension is requested.

Equal Employment Opportunity

Decisions on appointment, reappointment, promotion and tenure are made without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, or age.

 

Guidelines for Tenure and Promotion to Associate Professor

The candidate is expected to be an independent researcher in their field who has established a focused program of research at Auburn University. Independence is in part demonstrated by having a focused program of research apart from their primary graduate school research mentor or postdoctoral advisor. Thus, for example, publications that primarily rely on data or a dissertation prior to appointment to Auburn are important, but candidates must also demonstrate the ability to independently develop and conduct a sustained research program. 

The ability to conduct and engage in a sustained research/creative program is also required for tenure and promotion to associate professor. Thus, a gap on a CV — a year or more during which little or no work is published — requires significant explanation, justification and supporting evidence (e.g., the faculty member was working on a book or had undertaken a major administrative responsibility).  Gaps without such supporting evidence negatively affect promotion and tenure reviews.

Published research is weighted more heavily than papers presented at scholarly meetings. While conference presentations are valuable and serve to enhance a faculty member’s national and international visibility, all faculty members should plan to convert their conference papers into publications as soon as possible after presentation.

It is incumbent on candidates to indicate timelines for when research/creative projects began (e.g., prior to or after appointment at Auburn) and were completed, to provide a timeline of research progress (e.g., dates of IRB submissions/data collection, filming/editing), as well as any related presentations and publications; to explain gaps in their research program and, to justify/explain a lack of sustained research.

Questions Guiding Evaluation:

The committee, tenured full and associate professors, and external reviewers will consider the candidate’s total scholarly record with these questions as guidelines:

  • Has the scholarly work been regular, continuous and focused, or sporadic and diffused? Is the research sustained or do gaps exist? If there are gaps, are they explained, fully justified, and is sufficient supporting evidence provided?
  • Was the bulk of the published scholarly work created and developed after their appointment to the School/Auburn University? Or, does much of the candidate’s publications rely on research conducted prior to becoming a TT faculty member of the School (e.g., drawn from graduate school, from prior positions)? Similarly, was the majority of a creative work completed prior to the candidate’s AU appointment?
  • Is the work innovative, break new ground, or have the potential to move the field in new directions? Has the work been perceived as significant in the field? (Evidence of significance might consist of, among other things, publication in top journals; citation by others; awards; invitations to publish in anthologies, collections and/or books; use by others in classes; appointment to editorial boards and editor positions.
  • Is the work, as a whole, theoretically based and appropriately grounded in existing literature? Is the methodology consistently sound? Are studies well executed? Are conclusions appropriate? Is the writing appropriate for the intended audience?
  • Are the majority of the scholarly publications solo authored? Is there evidence that the candidate is the leader of a major part of co-authored research (e.g., order of authorship, coauthoring with graduate students)?  

The School of Communication and Journalism follows the general university guidelines for promotion to  associate professor and tenure as outlined in the Faculty Handbook Section 3.6. In addition, the candidate should demonstrate achievements in the areas of research or creative work, teaching, service and outreach if applicable. Although faculty members are not required to perform outreach, it may count toward tenure and promotion to associate professor. The candidate is also expected to work in a collegial manner with other faculty to advance the research, creative work, teaching and service missions of the School. Because the School is home to a wide range of disciplines, the candidate must provide a description of the appropriate context in which their research or creative work is to be evaluated.

Discipline and Peer Standards for Measuring Significance of Research and Creative Works

Research and creative works will be considered according to the following criteria:

  • It is the candidate’s responsibility to clearly and fully demonstrate the significance of their work in their field of research to the Committee.
  • The scope of a publication or an exhibition influences how the work will be judged. National and international publications or exhibitions are considered more significant than regional or state publications or exhibitions.
  • The acceptance rate of a publication or venue status of an exhibition, such as the reputation of the venue (festival, exhibition, publication etc.), acceptance standards, audience, reviews, awards, collections, acquisitions, competitions, gallery affiliations et al., influence how the work will be judged.
  • The citations and recognitions of works, such as awards or reviews, influence how the work will be judged. Recognitions and awards will be judged in a similar manner to the scope of the work.
  • The applicant’s contribution to a work or exhibition will impact how the work will be judged. If the work is not solo-authored or created, then percentage of contribution will be considered. For creative works, the length of time and labor involved, as well as the production and distribution costs will be considered.
  • Juried or peer-reviewed works will weigh more significantly than invited works. However, invited works may suggest an established reputation in a particular field.
  • Should the candidate include journals in other academic fields or interdisciplinary journals, it is the candidate’s responsibility to demonstrate their relevance to the candidate’s field of expertise.
  • Should the candidate include articles from non-refereed journals, the candidate should include a justification of the review process, such as a board of peer editors, a special issue editor, etc.
  • Should the candidate include book chapters, invited or peer reviewed, the chapter must be original and previously unpublished (in whole or in part) research that makes a significant contribution to the body of knowledge in the candidate’s field of expertise.
  • The extent and scope to which a candidate’s work has achieved a reputation will be considered.
  • Grants, fellowships, research contracts provide indications of peer interest in the candidate’s research. The prestige of the granting agency, degree of competition and scarcity/availability of grants may also be considerations.
  • Should an applicant include a book, the reputation of the publishing house, type of audience, quality of reviews, and awards, as well as whether the book is the result of new research or the reworking of already published material. Vanity press and/or self-published books are not considered toward promotion.
  • Textbooks will only be considered in extraordinary circumstances in which the text makes a significant and impactful contribution to a body of knowledge. In no cases will textbooks supplant the requirements for scholarly books, articles, or creative works to be considered toward tenure or promotion.
  • A book publication alone is not sufficient to establish the strength of a sustained research program.  Additional supporting evidence of a sustained program should be provided (e.g., academic presentations, peer reviewed/juried works, etc.).

Academic Research

A candidate for tenure and promotion to associate professor should demonstrate an emerging regional or national reputation in their field of research by means of a sustained record of publication.

A sustained record is evidenced by regular publication throughout their candidacy.  Any significant gaps — a year or more during which little or no work is published – must be explained, justified, and supported.

It is the candidate’s responsibility to provide a sufficient description of the nature/type of research of each work, so that the committee can then judge the body of the candidate’s work based on its primary research focus: qualitative, multiple methods, or quantitative.

  • Qualitative research involves a number of differing approaches and defining features, including phenomenology, ethnography, indicative thematic analysis, grounded theory, case study, discourse analysis, narrative analysis, and mixed methods (for a fuller discussion of approaches and data collection implications, see Guest, Namey, & Mitchell, 2013, https://www.sagepub.com/sites/default/files/upm-binaries/48453_ch_1.pdf) For the purposes of review, and not to be confused with multiple methods research, mixed method research involves the active and intentional integration of both qualitative and quantitative approaches in a single study or series of studies as part of the candidate’s sustained research program will evaluated as qualitative research.
  • Multiple methods, or multi-method design, is “when two or more research projects are conducted, each complete in itself, to address research questions and/or hypotheses, a topic, or a program. Studies may be a combination of quantitative methods, qualitative methods, or both. The projects can be implemented concurrently or sequentially. However, unlike mixed methods, each study project is independently planned and conducted to answer a particular sub-question” (Morse, 2003).
  • Quantitative research emphasizes systematic empirical investigation of observable phenomena; utlizes objective measurements and the statistical, mathematical, or numerical analysis of data collected through polls, questionnaires, and surveys, or by manipulating pre-existing statistical data using computational techniques (Babbie, 2010).

Evaluation Standard 1

In this area the candidate will be judged by two standards.  The first standard for tenure and promotion to associate professor is research production, either A) refereed  articles or B) academic books. 

Refereed articles should meet the following criteria:

  • The candidate should have published a minimum number of refereed articles in their field of research as indicated in this manual. Where a candidate’s publication record falls within the indicated range is based on the research methodology utilized in their research and identified in their dossier.
    • If the candidate’s area is qualitative/mixed method in nature, they should have published a minimum of 5 to 7 journal articles.
    • If the candidate’s area is multiple method in nature, they should have published a minimum of 7 to 10 peer-reviewed articles.
    • If the candidate’s area is quantitative in nature, they should either have published a minimum of 10 to 12 peer-reviewed articles.
  • The articles should be published in regional, national, and internationally recognized academic journals.
  • The acceptance rate for the journals should not exceed 20%. In the case of a higher acceptance rate, it is incumbent on the candidate to justify its inclusion.
  • In the case of an article that has been accepted for publication, but not yet been published, the candidate should demonstrate that the manuscript is in the publication schedule of the press. A letter of intent does not fulfill the requirement.

Academic books should meet the following criteria:

  • The candidate should publish at least one academic book.
  • The book must be published by a reputable university or academic commercial press. Vanity press or self- published books will not be considered.
  • In the case of a book that has been accepted for publication, but not yet been published, it is incumbent on the candidate to provide clear evidence from the editor that the book was accepted for publication and is scheduled for a specific publication date. A contract does not fill the requirement.
  • Should the candidate’s field of research have other established measures of academic success it is incumbent on the candidate to fully explain those requirements and justify their work in light of those criteria.

Additionally, the external review letters will play a significant role in determining if the candidate has met the standards of their field of research.

Evaluation Standard 2

The second standard in research for tenure and promotion to associate professor is the candidate’s scholarly record beyond such publications, including other externally reviewed scholarly published or presented works for consideration, such as book chapters in edited volumes, edited volumes or books, book reviews, essays, encyclopedia entries, presentations of research papers at scholarly conferences, and/or invited lectures.

  • All of these professional activities strengthen an application, but do not replace the central criteria of refereed journal articles or book.
  • External awards, grants, fellowships, and other research accomplishments also strengthen an application, but do not replace the central criteria for refereed articles or books.
  • Publications that are extraneous to the candidate’s scholarly field and inconsistent with the candidate’s assignment will not be counted toward qualifications for tenure or promotion.
  • In the case of non-scholarly publications, such as essays in professional or popular outlets, the burden falls on the candidate to demonstrate the essay’s scholarly significance.
Creative Work

A candidate for tenure and promotion to associate professor should demonstrate:

  • An emerging national reputation in their given field by means of a sustained record of high-quality juried exhibitions.
  • Awards, grants, commissions, reviews, catalogue reproductions, and articles and books addressing the candidate’s work, may also be considered evidence of an emerging national reputation. Invited exhibitions are a mark of distinction and should be weighted as such.
  • The expected number of exhibitions will vary greatly depending on the candidate’s medium, the scale and complexity of their work or design, as well as costs involved in production, distribution, and exhibition.
    • Nevertheless, as very general guidelines, an artist might be expected to exhibited four to five works in juried, respected, national or international venues;
    • A designer might be expected to exhibit eight to 10 projects in juried, respected, national or international venues.
  • While collaborative creative work count toward promotion and tenure, single-authored work should be given considerably greater weight.

In addition to works and designs, a candidate’s creative record may include:

  • Other invited or juried activities, including visiting-artist lectures, artist residencies, papers or lectures presented at conferences, curatorial projects, refereed publications, and consultancies.
    • All such professional activities strengthen a candidate’s case, but do not replace the standard or juried exhibitions at the national or international level.
  • In the case of commercially commissioned work, the burden falls on the candidate to demonstrate the piece’s creative significance by juried publication or exhibition at a juried design competition.

Teaching

A candidate for tenure and promotion to associate professor must submit documentation of teaching effectiveness that establishes a solid record of teaching. Such materials may include course syllabi, description of new courses offered, peer- and self-assessment, student evaluations, the use of scholarship or creative work in courses, grade distributions, teaching awards, graduate student committee membership, teaching publications, and any other relevant material.

Service

A candidate for tenure and promotion to associate professor is expected to establish a solid record of service to the University and discipline including participating in School, College and University governance and committee work; assisting in the recruitment of new faculty; and developing and assisting in the implementation of new academic programs. The candidate should highlight contributions to University life as well as service to the candidate’s profession, such as offices held and committee assignments performed for professional associations and learned societies, service on exhibition juries, grant panels, and editorships, and the refereeing of manuscripts.

Outreach (if applicable)

If part of a candidate’s workload, a candidate for tenure and promotion to associate professor is expected to demonstrate how research conducted has directly benefitted external audiences in support of School, College, and University missions. While outreach may be sponsored by a unit other than the faculty member’s School, both the faculty member and the sponsoring unit must recognize the activity as outreach. The candidate should explain how the application of their professional expertise worked to elucidate and alleviate societal problems,  issues, and concerns. Outreach should demonstrate the professional development of the faculty member, the expected public benefits of the outreach activities, and the mission of the School and/or other supporting units.

The Director should request any material necessary from the candidate to facilitate faculty assessment of the type, quality, and effectiveness of the candidate’s involvement in extension activities and evaluation of any resulting publications. Demands for quality in outreach are the same as in teaching and research/creative work; however, outreach activities are different in nature from other activities and must be evaluated accordingly. Please refer University Outreach office for resources concerning faculty participation in Outreach scholarship.

Collegiality

A candidate for tenure and promotion to associate professor is expected to be a good citizen of the School, College, and University. The candidate should contribute as a productive and collegial member of the School in all relevant areas. The candidate’s professional abilities and relationships with colleagues should be compatible with the School’s mission and long-term goals. The candidate should exhibit an ability and willingness to engage in shared academic and administrative tasks that faculty must often perform and participate with some measure of reason and knowledge in discussions germane to School policies and programs. The candidate should maintain high standards of professional integrity. Concerns respecting a candidate’s collegiality should be shared with the candidate as soon as they arise. Should concerns arise they will be addressed in the Faculty Annual Review and the yearly tenure and promotion review.

 

Guidelines for Promotion to Full Professor

The School of Communication and Journalism follows the general university guidelines for promotion to professor as outlined in the Faculty Handbook Section 3.3.4. In addition, the candidate:

  • should demonstrate achievements in the areas of research or creative work, teaching, service and outreach if applicable, beyond the standards for promotion to associate professor.
  • Although faculty members are not required to perform outreach, it may count toward promotion to professor.
  • is expected to work in a collegial manner with other faculty to advance the research, creative work, teaching, and service missions of the School beyond the standards for promotion to associate professor.
  • Because the School is home to a wide range of disciplines, the candidate must provide a description of the appropriate context in which their research or creative work is to be evaluated. In all cases, candidates have the burden of proving that their records of accomplishment is worthy of promotion to full professor. Except in extraordinary cases, a candidate should not pursue promotion to full professor until at least four academic years have passed since attaining associate professor.

Regarding promotion to Professor the AU Faculty Handbook states: “Professor is a rank requiring professional peer recognition of the individual as an authority in their field of specialization. A candidate must be recognized by associates as a capable teacher, scholar or artist, or outreach specialist. It is therefore expected that peers within and outside the University will attest to the candidate’s high professional standing. A candidate should hold the appropriate terminal degree (usually a doctorate) or the equivalent. Normally, a candidate must serve at least four complete years on full-time appointment at the associate professor level before they may be nominated for promotion to professor. Only in exceptional and well-documented cases in which a faculty member has met requirements for promotion to professor in a shorter time should they be recommended for early promotion by the department head/chair, with majority support of the faculty members who hold rank superior to that of the candidate. A candidate for professor should have demonstrated significant involvement in the teaching, research/creative work, or outreach functions of the University. They should also have participated in professional life and have been actively involved in departmental, college or school, and University affairs. For this rank it is essential that the candidate should have demonstrated a marked degree of scholarship appropriate to their assignment through work, typically publication or creative endeavor, subjected to peer review. By means of such activity, a candidate for the University’s highest academic rank should have a respected national reputation.”

Discipline and Peer Standards for Measuring Significance of Research and Creative Works

Promotion to the rank of professor is based primarily on the attainment of high professional standing as demonstrated by national or international recognition in the candidate’s academic or creative field, as determined by peers within the candidate’s discipline. 

  • The successful candidate for promotion must demonstrate regular, consistent, and sustained original scholarship or creative production, and an outstanding body of works, scholarly or creative, beyond those required for promotion to associate professor. Research gaps must be explained, fully justified, and is sufficient supporting evidence provided.
  • A promotion to full professor cannot be achieved through conference presentations, guest lectures, textbooks or administrative service alone.
  • Although faculty are expected to maintain an excellent record of teaching and service to the School, College, University and discipline, the rank of professor cannot be attained through excellence in service, outreach, or teaching.

Academic research and creative works will be judged by the same discipline and peer standards for measuring significance of research and creative works used in promotion to associate professor.

In the case of promotion to professor the following additional standards will be applied:

  • It is the candidate’s responsibility to clearly and fully demonstrate the significance of their work in their field of research to the Committee.
  • It is expected that the candidate’s work will be subject to peer or juried review at national and international levels, and will demonstrate high standards of relevance, continuity, accomplishment, and significance.
  • There should be an identification of intellectual focus, a clear research or creative agenda, and evidence of growth and consistency of effort in that area.
  • There should be a significant increase in productivity from the associate professor level, with an emphasis on both quality and quantity, and consistent output during the time period being assessed.
  • The effort associated with the research or creative works will be considered as part of the work’s overall merit (i.e., complex studies, time-consuming techniques, collection of large amounts of data, etc.)
  • The research should reflect the advancement of knowledge or art and the actual or potential influence of the research or creative output in the candidate’s field during the period assessed.

Academic Research

A candidate for promotion to professor should demonstrate a national or international reputation in their given field by means of a sustained record of publication. Sole authorship is expected, as it is evidence that the candidate is engaged in independent research that makes significant contributions to the body of knowledge in the candidate’s area of expertise. In the case of collaborative research, a majority of the publications must be first- authored. First authorship is evidence that the candidate is the driving force in the collaborative work. The candidate must specify the level of contribution of each author. Should the candidate’s field of research have other established measures of academic success it is incumbent on the candidate to fully explain those requirements and justify their work in light of those criteria. Additionally, the external review letters will play a significant role in determining if the candidate has met the standards of their field of research.

Evaluation Standard 1

The first standard for promotion to professor is research production, either A) refereed articles or B) academic books.

Refereed articles should meet the following criteria:

  • Candidate should publish two-thirds or greater the number of articles required for promotion to associate professor in their field of research as indicated in this manual.
    • Qualitative researchers should have published a minimum of three to five journal peer-reviewed articles.
    • Multiple method researchers should have published a minimum of five to seven peer-reviewed articles.
    • Quantitative researchers should have published a minimum of six to eight peer-reviewed articles.
  • The articles should be published in national and international academic journals.
  • The acceptance rate for the journals should not exceed 20%.
  • In the case of a higher acceptance rates, it is incumbent on candidates to justify inclusion.
  • In the case of an article that has been accepted for publication, but not yet been published, the candidate should demonstrate that the manuscript is in the publication schedule of the press.
  • A letter of intent does not fulfill the requirement.

Academic books should meet the following criteria:

  • The candidate should publish at least one academic book.
  • The book must be published by a reputable university or academic commercial press. Vanity press or self-published books will not be considered.
  • In the case of a book that has been accepted for publication, but not yet been published, it is incumbent on candidates to provide clear evidence from editors that the book was accepted for publication and is scheduled for a specific publication date. A contract does not fill the requirement.

Evaluation Standard 2

The second standard in research for promotion to professor is the candidate’s scholarly record beyond such publications, including other externally reviewed scholarly published or presented works for consideration, such as book chapters in edited volumes, edited volumes or books, book reviews, essays, encyclopedia entries, presentations of research papers at scholarly conferences, and/or invited lectures.

  • All of  these professional activities strengthen an application, but do not replace the central criteria of refereed journal articles or books.
  • External awards, grants, fellowships, and other research accomplishments also strengthen an application, but do not replace the central criteria for refereed articles or books.
  • Publications that are extraneous to the candidate’s scholarly field and inconsistent with the candidate’s assignment will not be counted toward qualifications for promotion.

Creative Work

A candidate for promotion to professor should demonstrate a national reputation in their given field by means of a sustained record of high-quality juried exhibitions beyond the standards required for promotion to associate professor. The expected number of exhibitions will vary depending on the candidate’s medium, the scale and complexity of their work or design, as well as costs involved in production, distribution, and exhibition. In general terms, an artist may be expected to have exhibited an additional four to five works and a designer an additional eight to ten projects all in juried, respected national or international venues.

In addition to works and designs, a candidate’s creative record may include:

  • Other invited or juried activities, including visiting-artist lectures, artist residencies, papers or lectures presented at conferences, curatorial projects, refereed publications, and consultancies.
  • Awards, grants, commissions, reviews, catalogue reproductions, and articles and books addressing the candidate’s work, may also be considered evidence of an emerging national reputation.
  • Invited exhibitions are a mark of distinction and should be weighted as such.
  • In the case of commercially commissioned work, the burden falls on the candidate to demonstrate the piece’s creative significance by juried publication or exhibition at a juried design competition. All such professional activities strengthen a candidate’s case, but do not replace the standard or juried exhibitions at the national or international level.
  • In the case of commercially commissioned work, the burden falls on the candidate to demonstrate the piece’s creative significance by juried publication or exhibition at a juried design competition.
  • While collaborative creative work count toward promotion and tenure, single- authored work should be given considerably greater weight.

Teaching

A candidate for promotion to professor must submit documentation that establishes a solid record of teaching beyond the standards for promotion to associate professor. Such materials may include course syllabi, description of new courses offered, peer- and self-assessment, student evaluations, the use of scholarship or creative work in courses, grade distributions, teaching awards, graduate student committee membership, teaching publications, and any other relevant material. While candidates for full professor are expected to be excellent teachers, promotion cannot be achieved through excellent teaching alone.

Service

A candidate for promotion to professor is expected to maintain a solid record of service to the University and discipline including participating in School, College and University governance and committee work; assisting in the recruitment of new faculty; and developing and assisting in the implementation of new academic programs. The candidate should detail particularly distinctive contributions to University life, including service to the School, College, and University through governance and committee work, assisting the School with the recruitment of new faculty, service to the candidate’s profession, such as offices held and committee assignments performed for professional associations and learned societies, service on exhibition juries, grant panels, and editorships, and the refereeing of manuscripts. Excellent service is expected of candidates for full professor, but the rank cannot be achieved through excellent service alone.

Outreach (if applicable)

If part of a candidate’s workload, a candidate for promotion to professor is expected to demonstrate how research conducted has directly and distinctively benefitted external audiences in support of School, College, and University missions. While outreach may be sponsored by a unit other than the faculty member’s School, both the faculty member and the sponsoring unit must recognize the activity as outreach. The candidate should explain how the application of their professional expertise worked to elucidate and alleviate societal problems, issues and concerns. Outreach should demonstrate the professional development of the faculty member, the expected public benefits of the outreach activities, and the mission of the School and/or other supporting units.

The Director should request any material necessary from the candidate to facilitate faculty assessment of the type, quality, and effectiveness of the candidate’s involvement in extension activities and evaluation of any resulting publications. Demands for quality in outreach are the same as in teaching and research/creative work; however, outreach activities are different in nature from other activities and must be evaluated accordingly. Please refer University Outreach office for resources concerning faculty participation in Outreach scholarship.

Collegiality

A candidate for and promotion to professor is expected to be an exemplary citizen of the School, College, and University. The candidate should contribute as a productive and collegial member of the School in all relevant areas beyond those expected for promotion to associate professor. The candidate’s professional abilities and relationships with colleagues should be compatible with the School’s mission and long-term goals. The candidate should exhibit a willingness to engage in shared academic and administrative tasks that faculty must often perform and participate with some measure of reason and knowledge in discussions germane to School policies and programs. The candidate should maintain high standards of professional integrity. Concerns respecting a candidate’s collegiality should be shared with the candidate as soon as they arise. Should concerns arise they will be addressed in the Faculty Annual Review and the yearly tenure and promotion review.

 

Guidelines for Promotion to Senior Lecturer

The School of Communication and Journalism follows the general university guidelines for promotion to Senior Lecturer. In addition, the candidate should demonstrate significant achievements in the areas of teaching and service. The candidate is also expected to work in a collegial manner with other faculty to advance the teaching and service missions of the School.

A Lecturer may apply for promotion to Senior Lecturer after a minimum of five years of consecutive employment by the School. The initiation process for promotion can begin with a Lecturer or the Director. Both the candidate and the Director must supply detailed information regarding both the candidate’s teaching and service to evaluate the candidate’s potential and achievement (e.g., evidence of teacher training, service to the School, strong peer and student evaluations, relevant community outreach, etc.), which will then be made available first to full-time faculty members for a vote.

In addition to the vote, the Director will write a letter for or against the candidate’s promotion. Full- time faculty members may also contribute letters supporting or opposing the candidate’s promotion. Once all the materials have been collected, they will be made available to the candidate. The candidate may then choose whether or not to continue the promotion process. Should the candidate choose to continue, all of the information will be sent to the Dean for final approval. It is important to note that the candidate does have the option to appeal the Dean’s decision should it be found unsatisfactory.

For more information detailing the process described above, please see http://www.auburn.edu/academic/provost/pdf/Lecturer_Promotion_guidelines_final.pdf.

 

Annual Tenure Review Guidelines and Third-Year Review

Annual Tenure Review Guidelines

All non-tenured, tenure-track faculty will undergo a comprehensive review by the Tenure and Promotion Committee each spring. In implementing the annual T&P review, the School will follow these procedures:

  • The faculty member is required to prepare a dossier using the Tenure and Promotion guidelines established by the AU Faculty Handbook and amended by the School and College with three exceptions:
  • No outside review letters will be requested.
  • Candidates are asked to include the first page of all published articles as well as letters of acceptance for articles in press.
  • Candidates should also include a discussion of works in progress and include evidence of progress.
    • Candidates should indicate progress on the article since the previous year’s evaluation if the article was included the year before.
  • The candidate should email one copy of the completed dossier to the Director by Feb. 15.

The Tenure and Promotion Committee will meet no later than March 15 of the same semester to review the dossier and provide feedback to the Director as to the candidate’s progression toward tenure requirements, emphasizing issues of concern and recognitions of accomplishments in the areas of academic research, creative works, teaching, service, collegiality and outreach, if applicable.

  • After the dossier has been reviewed, the Director will share the tenured committee’s feedback in a summary letter for the candidate.
  • The written evaluation provided for in the annual review process and will include any issues raised by the tenured faculty.
  • Should the Committee determine that the faculty member is making unsatisfactory progress the candidate will receive a letter of termination effective at the end of spring semester the following academic year.
Third Year Review

The third-year review is a more rigorous review.

  • To reveal the judgment of tenured faculty, the review shall conclude with a vote by secret ballot on whether or not, in the judgment of the tenured faculty, the candidate is making appropriate progress toward tenure.
  • The result of the vote shall be announced at the meeting.
    • Faculty should understand that this vote is not a commitment to grant or deny tenure in the future.
  • The third-year review letter will cover the findings of the review and communicate the School’s vote to the candidate.
Post-Tenure Review

The School follows the University’s policies concerning post-tenure review as described in the Faculty Handbook in Chapter 2, Section 3.7.3. Post-tenure review is triggered by an “overall ‘unacceptable’ annual evaluation determined by the composite of the weighted evaluations of the faculty member’s workload assignments will put the tenured faculty member on warning that the PTR process may be triggered by a second overall “unacceptable” annual evaluation received during the next five years. (In other words, two overall unacceptable annual evaluations in a six-year period will trigger PTR.) It shall be the department head/chair’s responsibility, in consultation with the dean, to notify in writing, by May 15 of each year, the faculty member and the Office of the Provost whenever PTR is triggered by a second overall “unacceptable” evaluation during any six-year period. Failure to provide this notification does not negate the requirement for PTR.”

The policy on post-tenure review is not a dismissal policy and should not be viewed as such; the University’s dismissal policy appears in Chapter 3, Section 9.2 of the AU Faculty handbook.

Last Updated: November 08, 2021