Caroline Marshall Draughon Center for the Arts & Humanities

Talk on the Origins of Alabama's Boundaries

Talk on the Origins of Alabama's Boundaries

The public is invited to “The Historic Origins of Alabama’s Boundaries,” a talk by David Robb, on Thursday, September 19 at 4:00 p.m. at the Caroline Marshall Draughon Center for the Arts & Humanities at Pebble Hill.

Alabama’s distinctive shape originates in this area’s rich history, and thus reflects a wide variety of issues and factors. These include: rivers and other geographic features, Native American traditions, colonial aspirations, land speculations, territorial squabbles, national politics, and international confrontations. All play a role in setting Alabama’s borders with its neighbors. This presentation will show how Alabama’s northern and southern borders originate during the colonial era, and how our eastern and western boundaries reflect Indian treaties and early Federal issues.

Trained as an art historian, David Robb served as curator at art museums in Washington DC, Minneapolis, and Fort Worth; and most recently as museum director in Savannah and Huntsville. Since retiring from the Huntsville Museum of Art, he has become involved with history programs at the Alabama Department of Archives and History, and the Alabama Historical Association. In his recent research on map design issues, especially of historic Alabama maps, Robb has been fortunate to locate Thomas Freeman’s initial 1807 map of Madison County, and Thomas Bibb’s 1818 map for the first Seal of Alabama.

The event is free, open to the public, and will be followed by refreshments. The Caroline Marshall Draughon Center for the Arts & Humanities at Pebble Hill is located at 101 S. Debardeleben Street, Auburn.

For more information on the program, call 334-844-4903 or visit www.auburn.edu/cah

Last Updated: September 12, 2019